Book Review: From Sun To Sun: A Hospice Nurse Reflects on the Art of Dying by Nina Angela McKissock

Posted November 20, 2019 by lomeraniel in Audiobooks, Memoirs, Non-Fiction, Review, Self Development / 0 Comments

Book Review: From Sun To Sun: A Hospice Nurse Reflects on the Art of Dying by Nina Angela McKissockFrom Sun to Sun: A Hospice Nurse Reflects on the Art of Dying by Nina Angela McKissock
Narrator: Karen Gundersen
Published by Self-published on 08-24-17
Genres: Memoirs, Non-Fiction, Self Development
Length: 7 hrs and 23 mins
Format: Audiobook
Source: Narrator
Buy on Amazon/Audible
Goodreads
Overal Rating: four-stars

Twenty-one people of different ages have one thing in common; they’re within six months of their deaths. They’ve endured the battle of the medical system as they sought cures for their illnesses, and are now settling in to die. Some reconcile, some don’t. Some are gracious, some not. As Nina Angela McKissock, a highly experienced hospice nurse, goes from home to home and within the residential hospice, she shares her journey of deep joy, humorous events, precious stories, and heartbreaking love.

Free of religiosity, dogma, or fear, From Sun to Sun brings readers into McKissock’s world—and imparts the profound lessons she learns as she guides her beloved patients on their final journey.

I listened to Farewell: Vital End-of-Life Questions last year, and it was a topic that I found more interesting than I initially expected. When I read about this book, I immediately wanted to listen to it too. Not because it is something that affects me right now but I think death is something we should not turn our back on. Knowledge is power.

The book is a collection of short stories, each one about a person dying. Nina carefully shows us how this experience is lived by an array of quite different people, and teaches us kindness,  understanding, and respect. I appreciated that this was not a religious book,  so it can be read by anyone. It is a bit on the spiritual side, mentioning reiki and similar practices, but I guess it is difficult to avoid talking spiritual when one is near the gates of death. It is not something for me, but I respect it and I understand that it may bring comfort to some.

This is a more personal book than Farewell, with Nina sharing some of her personal story, additionally to her patients’, with the intention of making people think about each and every day and to avoid regrets. Farewell went deep about medical and legal aspects, but it is not the case here. The difference is probably due to the fact that Farewell is written by a physician, while From Sun to Sun is written by a nurse. Both are sides of1 the same coin, complementing each other, but different nonetheless. Nurses perhaps are the ones who show the most humane side of modern medicine.

I think both books are really good, each in their own way. While Farewell is probably better read in advance to be prepared ahead of time, From Sun to Sun can be read at any time, for one’s sake, but also while suffering the ordeal of a loved one close to death.

I found Karen Gundersen’s really soothing, enjoyable, and a perfect match for the book. It was like I was listening to Nina herself, pouring her heart into these stories. Technically, I found some minor issues, like some noticeable audio edits and a repeated sentence (a remain from a punch and roll) around 6:42:01.

Even though I looked forward to this book, I was afraid that it could be too much at times. Surprisingly, I devoured it in less than two days. Highly recommendable.

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
Story (Plot)
four-half-stars
Narration
four-stars
Overall: four-stars
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